[Pose Of the Week] Upward Bound Fingers Pose (Beginner)

Upward bound fingers pose

Stretch and strengthen your upper body and joints with Upward Bound Fingers Pose…

Upward Bound Fingers Pose (Urdva Baddha Hastasana) – also known as Upward Bound Hands Pose – a basic beginner-level yoga pose that provides a wonderful stretch for the arms, shoulders, hands and wrists. This is a great pose for joint health, especially if you spend a lot of time driving or working on the computer, and it is also helpful for maintaining function and mobility in your upper back and shoulders, as well as for reducing swelling in the forearms or hands. It may also be helpful for easing or preventing carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis or golfer’s elbow, arthritis in the joints of the hands, arms, or shoulders, or weakness in the shoulder girdle area. This is also an energizing pose that helps to reduce fatigue and improve clarity of mind.

You can do this pose at your desk or while traveling as it may be done in a seated position if desired.

Those who have an existing rotator cuff injury, or any other joint issues should use caution when practicing this pose. If you have a history of high blood pressure, heart conditions, blood clots, or osteoporosis, you should consult with a doctor before performing this pose to make sure it is suitable for you.

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There are two versions of Upward Bound Fingers Pose – one with the palms up, and one with the palms down. Both have slightly different benefits, so you may wish to practice both versions, depending on which benefits you are looking for.
Here are a few of the differences between the two, according to Yoga for Healthy Aging:

Version 1, in which your palms are turned up toward the sky, takes your wrists into extension, which is a good is a counter-pose for people who are working with their hands all day, whether typing at a computer or using tools for your job. In addition to releasing the wrists, this version stretches the inner surface of your forearms, which could be beneficial to people with golfer’s elbow (inflammation at the inner elbow).

Version 2, in which your palms are facing the floor, you get a good stretch on the opposite side of your forearm, which could be helpful for people who have tennis elbow. Because the yoga practice typically requires a lot of wrist extension (think Downward-Facing Dog pose, Cat/Cow pose, and Plank pose), Cat Cow, Version 2 of this pose is an effective counter-pose for yoga poses where you bear weight on your hands.

How to Do Upward Bound Fingers Pose:

Version 1: Start by standing in Mountain pose, with your feet about hips-width apart (or sit on a chair with your feet flat on the floor). Now, interlace your fingers and turn your palms toward your feet. Strengthen your legs, pressing from your hips into your feet. Then, on an inhalation, bring your arms forward and up. Lengthen your spine and lift your collarbones as your lift your shoulder blades. Move your arms toward a vertical position, keeping your head in a neutral position. Once you encounter resistance in your shoulders or upper back, resist the impulse to take your arms further back. Stay in the position for about one minute, possibly working up to two minutes.

To come out of the pose, lower your arms forward and down before releasing the clasp of your hands. Pause for a few minutes and notice the effects of the pose on your whole upper body (hands, wrists, arms, and shoulders).

Version 2:
Start by standing in Mountain pose, with your feet about hips-width apart (or sit on a chair with your feet flat on the floor). Now, interlace your fingers and keep your palms upward. Strengthen your legs, pressing from your hips into your feet. Then, on an inhalation, bring your arms forward and up. Lengthen your spine and lift your collarbones as your lift your shoulder blades. Move your arms toward a vertical position, keeping your head in a neutral position. Once you encounter resistance in your shoulders or upper back, resist the impulse to take your arms further back. Stay in the position for about one minute, possibly working up to two minutes.

To come out of the pose, lower your arms forward and down before releasing the clasp of your hands. Pause for a few minutes and notice the effects of the pose on your whole upper body (hands, wrists, arms, and shoulders).

Read More at YogaForHealthyAging.Blogspot.com

 

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Rose S.


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