[Pose Of the Week] Supported Child’s Pose (Beginner)

Supported Child's Pose tutorial

Give yourself comfort and support in Supported Child’s Pose…

Supported Child’s Pose is a restorative version of Child’s Pose that soothes stress and anxiety. This protective supported pose shields the vital energy centers of the body and gives us the confidence to relax and let go of stress, overwhelm, and anything that may be weighing on the mind. It also helps to stretch and release tension in the lower back, and is especially helpful for easing soreness and stiffness after being on your feet for a while.

This is a great pose to do when you’re feeling frazzled, overwhelmed, or not in control of your life!

While this gentle pose is suitable for just about anyone, those with knee issues should use caution and skip this pose if you feel any pain.

If your feet or ankles feel uncomfortable, you may wish to place a rolled towel under your ankles. You can also use two bolsters – or additional pillows – to raise the height of the support if that feels better. If you are pregnant, you can just place pillows or bolsters under your chest only to leave room for your growing belly.

How to Do Supported Child’s Pose:

  • Slowly, lower yourself so that both knees are on your yoga mat a little wider than your hips. If you need more padding, place a folded blanket beneath your knees. Your shins should be flat on the mat with your feet behind you, soles facing the ceiling.
  • Sit on your heels.
  • Place a bolster (or pillow, couch cushion, or rolled blanket) lengthwise between your thighs. Exhale and lay forward onto the bolster, turning your head sideways, and let the bolster support the full weight of your head.
  • Allow your arms to relax to the ground, reaching forward a bit.
  • Close your eyes and focus on your breath. As humans, we breathe approximately 22,000 times each day. Allow this posture to help you find a deep connection with each breath.
  • Halfway through the pose, turn your head the other way so that your neck receives an even stretch.
Read more at UnboundNorthwest.com

 

About the author

Rose S.


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